Install the latest Mozilla Thunderbird or Firefox in Ubuntu GNU/Linux

So I ran into an issue with my Mozilla Thunderbird today when I was finished setting up my new email, contact, and calendar server with Mail-in-a-box. So I go to add the lightning extension for calendars, and low and behold I find out my Thunderbird (the one that came in the the default Xubuntu repos for 14.04LTS) was out of date and not supported by lightning. The Ubuntu repos had version 38.8, but what version was Mozilla at themselves? 45.1 as of this post. So I quickly installed the latest binary but I tend to be forgetful about updates, so I wanted to tie it into the apt package manager so I found a PPA that works.

First if thunderbird is installed remove it, and maybe backup your .thunderbird folder just in case. But you shouldn’t have to worry about losing any data.

sudo apt-get remove -y thunderbird

Next we need to add a new repository called Ubuntuzilla so edit your sources.list. I used nano for this, but feel free to use whatever you like.

sudo nano /etc/apt/sources.list
add to the end
deb http://downloads.sourceforge.net/project/ubuntuzilla/mozilla/apt all main

or you can do that all with one command
echo -e "\ndeb http://downloads.sourceforge.net/project/ubuntuzilla/mozilla/apt all main" | sudo tee -a /etc/apt/sources.list > /dev/null

Then grab the keys and update
sudo apt-key adv --recv-keys --keyserver keyserver.ubuntu.com C1289A29
sudo apt-get update

Install your desired package, with one of the following commands:
sudo apt-get install firefox-mozilla-build
sudo apt-get install thunderbird-mozilla-build
sudo apt-get install seamonkey-mozilla-build

Source

How to make “WHOIS” work with new TLD’s e.g. *.xyz, *.online

So I have been building a lot of servers and generally I like to segment them to different domains but whois by default only will work with *.com, *.info, *.net you know the usual TLD’s you think of. But now there are so many new ones I like to scoop up I still want to test my server settings with whois. Well have no fear on my Xubuntu 14.04LTS I use everyday simply create the file “whois.conf” in the /etc/ folder. So use your favorite text editor and paste this file in to get any new TLD resolved.
Open Nano (or whatever text editor you prefer)
sudo nano /etc/whois.conf

Once inside your text editor paste this list (list is very long so I added a read more section you will need to open to see the entire list)

#
# WHOIS servers for new TLDs (http://www.iana.org/domains/root/db)
# Current as of 2015-09-12
#

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How to Make Super Secure Passwords Easily with One Command

We all know when it comes to security, a secure password is always the most important thing. However remembering a complex password is always the toughest part anywhere. Especially when it comes to being a system administrator, our passwords are usually the most vital of anyone in the company. When it comes to telling people they need complex passwords, what always comes to mind is this xkcd comic about passwords.

password_strength

As the bottom text suggests we have come to the point where it’s hard for us to remember passwords, but easy for computers to guess. So what’s the solution? Well what I do as a GNU/Linux person is use the command already built in to generate super secure passwords using the sha1sum, sha224sum, sha256sum, sha384sum, and sha512sum commands.

First off pick a random word or phrase. Now remember capitalization, spaces, and such will always effect the sum spit out. let’s start with sha1sum which is the shortest, and using the word “password” as our example throughout this tutorial

echo "password" | sha1sum
c8fed00eb2e87f1cee8e90ebbe870c190ac3848c

So we see using the word “password” it spits out the sha1sum of the word, and we now have a very complex password. Now let’s try it with SHA256

echo "password" | sha256sum
6b3a55e0261b0304143f805a24924d0c1c44524821305f31d9277843b8a10f4e

So you see as we increase the strength of the sha256sum, the output sum is longer, and with a longer password comes even more security. Now let’s try SHA512

echo "password" | sha512sum
9151440965cf9c5e07f81eee6241c042a7b78e9bb2dd4f928a8f6da5e369cdffdd2b70c70663ee30d02115731d35f1ece5aad9b362aaa9850efa99e3d197212a

So now we see the output is incredibly long and complex. This is a great way to make incredibly secure passwords.